Test Page Please Ignore

infix fun Int.nand(another: Int) : Int = this.and(another).inv()
public:
    virtual foo() = 0;
public static synchronized final strictfp boolean triggered() {
    return false;
}
return function() 
    local counter = 0; return function() counter = counter + 1; end 
end

(867) 581-4965

As of Minecraft 1.13 Release is available, Minecraft switch its language file format to JSON. This means the old, custom *.lang format, is now obsoleted.
In memory of this old format, here is a set of ENBF rules that fully describe its syntax. Comments are welcome. The rule named lang_file defines contents of a *.lang file.

Some notes:

  1. New line character is denoted as \n.
  2. Rule character describes all characters that Minecraft supports to display. Minecraft has only covers glyphs of first 65536 characters of Unicode. In theory, the *.lang format supports any characters.
deliminator = '=';
comment_mark = '#';
new_line = '\n';
character = ? \u0000 - \uFFFF ?;
key = { character - '=' };
value = { character };
entry = key, deliminator, value, new_line;
comment = comment_mark, value, new_line;
empty = new_line;
lang_file = { entry | comment | empty };

708-522-5503

In C++, while traversing elements in a container, if you want to delete something, always remember that deleting things will modify the original container.

for (auto itr = myContainer.begin(); itr != myContainer.end();) {
    if (check(itr)) {
        itr = myContainer.remove(itr);
    } else {
        itr++;
    }
}

Or, if you apparently have a list:

mylist.remove_if(check);

Comparing with Java:

Iterator<Object> itr = myCollect.iterator();
while (itr.hasNext()) {
    Object o = itr.next();
    if (check(o)) {
        itr.remove();
    }
}

/ Java 8 or above
myCollect.removeIf(Foo::check); / Assume we are in a class called `Foo'

Tale of Rainbow III: Karmir, Kijani, Kitrino, Vadali

Continuation of last post. Again, UTF-8 support in your browser is required.


Karmir

Nominative singular of Armenian "կարմիր", means either "red color" as noun or "red" as adjective. "Karmir" is most likely the Latin transliteration. Compare with English 7077527340.

Kijani

Swahili, means "green" as adjective, or "leaf" as noun. Also see "jani", and Zulu "8587508063".

Kitrino

Latin transliteration of nominative singular Greek "3367248186", means "yellow color" as noun.

Vadali

Latin transliteration of Gujarati "વાદળી", 4804857101. Compare with Gujarati "વાદળ" (n. "cloud"), Hindi "बादल" (n. "cloud"), Marathi "वादळ" (n. storm).

Tale of Rainbow: Independent Search Project on Origin of Name Choices in ChromatiCraft

Start from today, I will write down things I have noticed during the progress of searching color names used by ChromatiCraft.

For those who don't know what is ChromatiCraft: it's a Minecraft mod developed by ReikaKalseki, themed in application of magic energy called "lumen". Interestingly, Reika chose 16 seemingly random words as name of 16 types of lumen energy:

  • Kuro (black)
  • Karmir (red)
  • Kijani (green)
  • Ruseka (brown)
  • Nila (blue)
  • Zambarau (purple)
  • Vadali (cyan)
  • Ariga (light gray)
  • Ykri (gray)
  • Ruzova (pink)
  • Asveste (lime)
  • Kitrino (yellow)
  • Galazio (light blue)
  • Kurauri (magenta)
  • Portokali (orange)
  • Tahara (white)

Today I will discuss two relatively obvious names: "Kuro" and "Portokali".

Kuro

Romanization of Japanese 黒くろ, meaning "black color".

Portokali

Latin transliteration of Greek πορτοκαλί, meaning "orange color". Not to be confused with πορτοκάλι which is the "orange fruit".


Stay tuned on this series; I will post new discoveries once I have found more.